Time to Upgrade!

For the first time software and hardware are peaking simultaneously. Investments made today will hold their value longer than ever in the past.

Microsoft’s OS Development
Windows 95 marked the end of direct hardware access. Developers griped, and software was a mess for a while, there was a steep learning curve for users. By the time Windows 98 came along, developers were in the groove, and users were familiar and happy with the upgrade. Windows 98 lasted a very long time.
Windows 2000 marked the end of cooperative multitasking. Developers griped, and software was a mess for a while, there was a steep learning curve for users. By the time Windows XP came along, developers were in the groove, and users were familiar and happy with the upgrade. Windows XP lasted a very long time.
Windows Vista marked the end of direct kernel hooks and a new driver model. Developers griped, and software was a mess for a while, there was a steep learning curve for users. By the time Windows 7 came along, developers were in the groove, and users were familiar and happy with the upgrade. Windows 7 will last a very long time.

Intel’s Architecture
Intel has been the dominate player in the CPU market for a very long time, but occasionally the main competitor, AMD, comes out with designs that are technologically superior (K8). Rewind a few years, AMD hadn’t been able to compete for a long time; Intel started making some very poor decisions for new products. CPU advancements stagnated. Finally, in 2005, AMD delivered a chip that blew the doors off Intel’s designs. Intel was forced to throw out their current roadmap, and design a new CPU from scratch. After a couple of years, Intel regained the performance lead, and there had been fierce competition until the release of Core i7 last year. AMD is unable to respond for the time being, and the performance war has devolved in to a price war.

Core i7, i5, i3 and Windows 7 are a winning combination. The time savings for the average user makes the cost of upgrading a no brainer. This advantage is echoed in the server arena with Intel Xeon 55xx and Windows 2008 R2. Combine the upgrades together, and the increase in productivity will pay for the upgrades and then some.
Suppose your fully weighted cost on an employee is $20/hr ($40k/yr). If a faster computer saves them 10 minutes a day, and you amortize hardware purchases over 3 years, you’ll be saving $46/month for every person upgraded. The savings are still positive even for minimum wage employees. Like I said.. no brainer. Servers are even more impactful because one upgrade affects all employees in the company.

For more information please contact us.
By phone at: (240) 780-3770
Or by email: info@gladetech.com